The Conveyancing Process

Selling your Property Before property goes on the market Before a property can be put on the market you will need an EPC (Energy Performance Certificate). These can be provided for you by your conveyancing specialist. When you instruct your solicitor or conveyancing agent, you should also request all the relevant forms and fixtures. This will save time later in the conveyancing process, you should complete property information documents provided to the best of your knowledge to avoid complications later in the process Offer This is when your conveyancer will contact the buyer's conveyancer with a contract package, usually by…

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What is Mediation?

Mediation is a form of meeting used in family law for working out financial circumstances and child ownership following a couple’s divorce and separation. A normal meeting of the two parties is likely to be unproductive and potentially dangerous if hostility is brewing between the couple. That is the importance of the mediation process as it can settle arguments and arrange agreements that may otherwise prove difficult to reach in hostile break ups. The process of mediation generally comes in four main steps: 1. The mediator assessment: The mediator's assessment is only there to ensure that no danger is presented…

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Inheritance Tax IHT 400 Form Explained

If you are the executor or the administrator for someone who has died, it is likely that you will need to complete HM Revenue & Customs’ (HMRC) form IHT 400, which provides the authorities with the information needed to determine how much inheritance tax is payable, and how the estate should be distributed (if there is no will). When completing the form you should pay careful attention to which sections you need to complete, for example if you answer No to question 24, you can proceed directly to question 29. The information you may need to supply on the form…

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Intestacy Explained

The intestacy rules set out how the estate will be distributed if a person dies without making a will. Passing away without first making a legal will is known as ‘dying intestate’. Essentially, when someone dies intestate, their nearest and dearest cannot control who gets what. Only close relatives can inherit, and common law partners who had not entered into a marriage or civil partnership with the deceased get nothing. The main rules regarding how estates are distributed are as follows: If there is a surviving spouse or civil partner, and no surviving children, grandchildren or great grandchildren – the…

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